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Letter from Ronald Sokol to Daniel Meador, Monday, June 14, 1982

[Note: With the exception of the Hotel stationary verbiage, this is a handwritten letter.]

-4- [sic] Ronald P. Sokol
13540 Puyricard
France

Chateau de la Caze [Coat of Arms] ✭✭✭✭
[Hotel Stationary] 14 June 1982

Dear Dan,

Having been back from Lisbon less than a
month, I have run off for a four-day
weekend with wife and one child. Tomorrow
we head back, leaving the small 15th century
chateau where we have been staying, surrounded by a
genuine moat and nestled up against the Tarn
River in the bottom of a deep gorge.

Yours of April 30th came, and I enjoyed as
always hearing from you. I appreciate your
sending the article. I brought it with me, but
have not yet looked at it, as I have been
bogged down with an ABA publication on Current
Legal Aspects of International Estate Planning. I
shall probably get to the equality report this
weekend or next. I appreciate your sending it.
Lee Loevinger wrote me that Justice After Darwin [?]
should be out in paperback and just called Justice.
I suggested this to Michie, and they liked the
idea but said they were not properly positioned
to market it as all their sales are direct.
I suppose it will languish, although I thought
it was a logical outgrowth of The Puzzle of Equality.

MALENE – 48210 SAINTE-ENIMIE – TÉL. (66) 48.51.01

[end of page 1]

-5- [sic]

Chateau de la Caze [Coat of Arms] ✭✭✭✭

Your letter of Dec. 11th wrote of Hardy
and was prescient. I saw in the International
Herald Tribune that he passed away. I suppose it
would be wrong to say that I shall miss him for like
all great teachers, he made himself a part of me and
I have him with me. Hardy’s contribution to thousands of
others must have been just as great. I lunched with him
several years ago–maybe two or three–in Paris. Although he
had aged, the spark was still there. I hope his dying
was peaceful.

Your report of your judges school fascinates me. It
certainly makes more sense to me to do what you are
doing than to do what the French do in making
judges a part of the civil service and trying to
teach them at university age to become a judge.
While the French idea has theoretical appeal, it does not, in my
view, adequately take into account the nature of the
human animal and the inexactness of “legal science.”
One of the evils that French society suffers from is that each
career avenue is, by and large, hermetically sealed off
from every other, and the lateral movement we see
from university to government to private practice or elsewhere
and that is tremendously enriching for all, is here largely
absent. In many ways, intellectual life here generally

MALENE – 48210 SAINTE-ENIMIE – TÉL. (66) 48.51.01

-5- [sic]

[end of page 2]

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Chateau de la Caze [Coat of Arms] ✭✭✭✭

suffers from this structural rigidity.

I have been getting to the states once or
twice a year, but have been basically going to
Arizona where my parents now spend most of the
year and to Oregon where they spend the rest and
where my sister and brother-in-law have a vineyard
and cherry orchard that I like to furrow in
when I can. I did get to Atlanta early
this year en route to Arizona to spend a weekend
with Wray Eckl and his wife whom I had
not seen since their marriage in 1962. The Spirit
apparently came upon [?] Wray as he had long ago given
up his pipe, taken up jogging, lost about 15 pounds,
and works like a horse seven days a week, a trait
which did not characterize him when we roomed
together although he was a serious student. I thoroughly
enjoyed seeing him again, and the 20 years fell
away as though they had not passed. This summer he
has agreed to greet my 10 year old and eldest son
and put him in a 2 week computer camp in
Atlanta.

What I was beginning to get at is that the
center of gravity for my trips to the U.S. has

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[end of page 3]

Chateau de la Caze [Coat of Arms] ✭✭✭✭

for better or worse, shifted from the East and
Middle West to the Southwest and Northwest
with California as kind of a transition point
because many of my French clients have
activities there. Nonetheless, you are well in mind
and on one of these trips I shall come via
Charlottesville and give you plenty of advance notice.
I would like to have a chance to talk to Dick
Merrill as I do not know him and to talk to
Lillich about the future of the Colloquium. I
was glad to hear that you went to the banquet. I
would have liked to have been there, but simply
could not work it out.

I would love to spend a few days with you
just talking.

I hope you and Jan are well. Warmest
regards to you both.

As ever,

Ron

-7- [sic]

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